Bohemian Bounty

Austin Organic Vegetable and Herb Garden Design, Installation & Maintenance

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There’s Rocks in Them There Soil

Preparing the farm for a family is no easy chore. We leave behind a renovated home, a ten year old garden (already planted for spring/summer), a revitalized pecan tree (thanks to our chicken manure), several fruit trees (loaded with peaches and rare figs), two rivers (one that is 72 degrees year-round), and a modern grocery store with lots of certified organic products.

One of the first chores of our move was to establish a garden. It’s a little late for planting a garden in our area but we will survive. The farmland is mostly covered in burmuda grass (devil weed) and we know we can never get rid of it so we dig deep and hope for the best.

We lucked out and got five free plats of plants (okra, melons, eggplant, summer squash, acorn squash, spaghetti squash and cucumbers) from C and J Nursery in Martindale. Apparently, they over-produced and would rather give them away then see them go to waste.

James tilled up a garden plot on the west side of the house, I added a water system, and Ele and I planted.

So, one thing will be working when we move in – the garden. Everything else needs repair! ;-)

Jen shows off some muscle pulling the trailer around!

Jen shows off some muscle pulling the trailer around!

Perfect alignment. Jen adjusts the trailer.

Perfect alignment.

Ele inspects the tiller while taking a break from planting with mom.

Ele inspects the tiller while taking a break from planting with mom.

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Posted 2 months, 2 weeks ago at 8:00 PM.

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Spring 2010 Garden Rescue

The Bohemians are in full swing for Spring – new and current clients are emailing and calling in preparation and we are still accepting clients. At the end of last year, new clients made Christmas wishes for gardens in 2010. Our first client to get their Christmas wish had an existing garden space that needed refurbishing.
This northwest Austin garden had great soil that was just waiting for dry weather to break ground.
We had 2 glorious days of sun in mid February to begin our work. The original space was wonderful and plentiful. The garden needed set pathways to make the space more usable and soil amendments to add nutrients for the Spring.

When anyone plans out a garden it is good to designate pathways from garden beds to preserve the health of your garden soil. Avoid stepping on your garden soil. Keep your garden beds between 3 and 4 feet wide. It is also a good idea to add natural slow release fertilizer (Medina Granular was used here) and a boost of Nitrogen from a low cost, natural cottonseed meal. We like using newspaper as a natural, biodegradable weed barrier and then cedar mulch over it. Walking and kneeling on mulch is more comfortable than stone but it needs to be refreshed as it degrades. Adding natural material onto the soil keeps the surface permeable for not only rainfall but living creatures like earthworms.

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Posted 4 years, 5 months ago at 3:59 PM.

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New Year Gardening: Food in 2010

Over the holiday of 2009, the Bohemian crew hibernated and took some time to work on our own gardens and catch up with family and friends. Work in the bohemian garden started out great – lots of great production from new seed varieties but the poor amount of sun has not been helpful. Plants have been growing slowly – healthily but slowly. The month of January has also been very trying – dry, cold winds and heavy freezes. Sadly the temperatures got so low on the January 7th and 8th that cool tolerant plants like mint, lettuces, and chards were damaged some. The recent rains have perked them up, though. Cabbages, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts look great.
As we head into 2010, we are noticing an increasing trend toward local and organic food support as well as home gardening. New products are showing up in stores and great events are planned around central Texas. Manufacturers are responding to market demands – your purchases are making a difference. We found raised bed kits (great for the do-it-yourself-er) for only $39.99. Another new item are nifty peck baskets filled with starter potatoes, onions, strawberries, and more ($9.98). Very nice kits for home gardeners. We continue to expect more of these items around this year. Seed sales have been very good and I’m sure the Bohemians have bought their fair share.
Other exciting changes in the local food trends are workshops and agritourism. Slow Food and the Texas Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (TOFGA) are hosting a year of farm tours. Look for workshops and volunteer opportunities on TOFGA’s websitee. Workshops vary from new farmer training to backyard gardening and animal husbandry to cooking from the garden.

We should also mention Jennifer has been elected the Volunteer Region 2 Director of TOFGA. Take a look at her Region 2 Webpage and give some feedback.

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Posted 4 years, 7 months ago at 11:18 AM.

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